This is Episode 20 of PsychCrunch, the podcast from the British Mental Society's Research Digest, sponsored by Routledge Psychology. Download here.

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What can psychology teach us about handling discomfort? Our speaker Ginny Smith finds out that swearing can have a pain-reducing impact, and puts the theory to the test with an experiment on editor Matthew Warren. Ginny also becomes aware of how virtual reality could provide a welcome interruption to patients struggling with persistent discomfort.

Our guests, in order of look, are: Dr Richard Stephens, Elder Speaker in Psychology at Keele University, and Dr Sam Hughes, Research study Fellow in discomfort neuroimaging at King's College London.

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PsychCrunch style music Catherine Loveday and Jeff Knowler.

Background reading for this episode:

Handling limb discomfort utilizing virtual reality: a systematic evaluation of scientific and experimental studies, a paper by Priscilla G Wittkopf and associates, is complimentary to access thanks to our sponsors Routledge Psychology

Research pointed out in this episode consists of:

  • Swearing as a reaction to discomfort
  • Swearing as a response to pain-effect of daily swearing frequency
  • Swearing as a reaction to discomfort: Examining hypoalgesic impacts of novel “swear” words
  • Attenuation of capsaicin-induced continuous discomfort and secondary hyperalgesia throughout exposure to an immersive virtual reality environment

Both Research Digest and T he Psychologist have a lot of posts on discomfort in the archives, consisting of:

Encouraging self-compassion might help people with persistent discomfort lead more active, happier lives

Super altruists (who have actually contributed a kidney to a stranger) show increased empathic brain activity when experiencing strangers in pain

Females who practice submissive BDSM displayed decreased empathy and an atypical neural action to other people's discomfort

What's different about the brains of the minority people who feel other individuals's physical pain?

Enjoying someone suffer extreme discomfort has a long lasting impact on the brain

Does it matter whether or not discomfort medication is branded?

Discomfort at Christmas: Ella Rhodes reports from the British Neuroscience Association's Christmas symposium

5 minutes with … Dr Harbinder Sandhu: A large trial aims to assist individuals with persistent pain taper their opioid use

The pain of youth: Line Caes and Abbie Jordan call for imagination in research study design with adolescents dealing with persistent health conditions

Big Picture: Pictures of pain: Measuring pain with illustrations

Pain– the backdrop of our lives: Ella Rhodes reports from a conference at UCL

Past PsychCrunch episodes:

Episode one: Dating and Destination
Episode 2: Breaking Bad Routines
Episode 3: How to Win an Argument
Episode 4: The Psychology of Present Providing
Episode 5: How To Find Out a New Language
Episode six: How To Be Ironical
Episode seven: Use Psychology To Contend Like an Olympian.
Episode eight: Can We Trust Psychological Studies?
Episode nine: How To Get The Best From Your Group
Episode 10: How To Stop Procrastinating
Episode eleven: How to Get a Good Night's Sleep
Episode twelve: How To Be Funnier
Episode thirteen: How to Research study and Find Out More Successfully
Episode fourteen: Mental Techniques To Make Your Cooking Taste Better
Episode fifteen: Is Mindfulness A Panacea Or Overhyped And Potentially Troublesome?
Reward episode (sixteen): What's It Like To Have No Mind's Eye?
Episode seventeen: How To Make Running Less Uncomfortable And More Enjoyable
Episode eighteen: How To Increase Your Imagination
Episode nineteen: Should We Fret About Screen Time?

PsychCrunch is sponsored by Routledge Psychology

PsychCrunch Banner April 16

Routledge talked to PsychCrunch presenter Christian Jarrett about the objectives of the podcast and engaging with the public about psychology research study.

Read More.

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